Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Posted By: FNB47
Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)
1469 MB | 2:19:26 | French with English s/t | XviD, 1210 Kb/s | 576x432

This unique retelling of the tale of Perceval is a great and glorious anomaly in Eric Rohmer's career. Adapted by Rohmer from the 12th-century book by Chrétien de Troyes, it marries ancient theater, medieval painting, music, and prose in a beautifully stylized film narrated in couplets by a chorus of singers and musicians playing traditional instruments, and often by the actors themselves.

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Fabrice Luchini glows with naïve innocence and wide-eyed wonder as the child-man Perceval, an ignorant but well-meaning young lord raised in isolation, who vows to become a knight after catching his first sight of what he believes to be godly beings. Fumbling through a whole new world of experiences on his quest, he takes his mother's advice to heart all too literally, leading to awkward, humorous, and sometimes tragic consequences, but he reaches the court of King Arthur, where he is knighted and begins his life of chivalry and good deeds. (–Sean Axmaker - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Rohmer builds his world on a huge circular set where bulbous metal sculptures stand in for trees, flat storybook castles look like giant cardboard toys, and the horizon is a backdrop painting. The story denies the expectations of modern storytelling, opting for an episodic series of lessonlike vignettes, culminating in a highly theatrical Passion play (featuring Luchini in the role of Christ). Perceval is a lovely and loving odyssey into the very nature of stories and storytelling, and one of the most original and unique visions in modern cinema. (–Sean Axmaker - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer's Perceval Le Gallois transports us back to the Middle Ages, offering a magical vision of the Grail legend in poetry, music, and simple imagery. The film is set in the time of King Arthur and his roundtable. By using costumes based on religious paintings of the Middle Ages, and sets of miniature gold castles and metallic trees, standing silhouetted in front of a painted canvas backdrop, Rohmer creates a sense of childlike wonder. Though based on an unfinished 12th century novel by Chretien de Troyes, the text has been modernized for modern audiences. Female and male choruses sing the connecting narration in traditional rhyming couplets and, with true theatrical flair, actors speak not only their lines but also the thoughts of the characters (http://imdb.com/title/tt0078073/usercomments)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Perceval is a naïve youth who lives with his mother. When he is awed by his first encounter with a knight, he determines to go to King Arthur's court to become a knight. Securing the blessings of the King, he takes lessons in chivalry from the wise Gornemant de Goort (Raoul Billerey). His adventures and a subplot involving Gawain take up the remainder of the film. Perceval first captures the heart of Blanchefeur (Arielle Dombasle), then those of other fair maidens, always remembering the simple tenets taught to him by Gornemant. With a powerful depiction of the passion of Jesus Christ and an episode involving the Bloody Lance and the Holy Grail, Perceval gives us a modern insight into chivalry, and also allows us to glimpse the underlying mystery of life. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0078073/usercomments)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Based on Chretien de Troyes medieval book, the film is at times faithful to its literary source and at times very, very eccentric. The style is difficult to explain: the movie wallows in its deliberate artificiality, with its cardboard sets, its wooden acting, and its impromptu (and wonderful) medieval songs. And to top it all, the movie ends with a long rendering of a medieval mass. The movie has a lot of humor actually, which is fairly unusual in Rohmer films, a humor that is very self-conscious and is very 20th century (brechtian distance is a phrase that comes to mind when you watch this film), yet at the same time, the film sometimes looks as a film that could have been made in the 12th century, had the technology been available back then. (amazon.com)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Naturalism is thrown out the window. The landscape is reduced to a bare minimum. Trees are sculpted out of metal, and are more symbols of trees than trees themselves. Castles are small, like the skenes of ancient Greek theater. The palette is made up of mostly primary colors. White appears frequently, and there are a couple of scenes with some purple. Silver and gold are abundant. This goes for the sets and constumes. The acting is exaggerated, I think, to imitate a Medieval style. Best of all, a lot of the narrative is sung to gorgeous Medieval arrangements. This is perhaps the most hypnotizing aspect of the film. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0078073/usercomments)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Rohmer has created a world that is often breathtakingly beautiful. Indeed, many of the shots feel as though they'd dropped to us from glorious tapestry hanging from a damp castle wall. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0078073/usercomments)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Eric Rohmer-Perceval le Gallois (1978)