Wind and Solar Power Systems

Posted By: maxxum
Wind and Solar Power Systems

Mukund R. Patel, «Wind and Solar Power Systems»
CRC Press | ISBN 0849316057 | March 30, 1999 | PDF | 5.9 Mb | 368 Pages






Book Description
Wind and solar energy are pollution-free sources of abundant power. With renewable power generation expected to become more and more profitable with open access to transmission lines and rapid growth around the world, the design, operation, and control of alternative energy resources becomes an essential field of study. Wind and Solar Power Systems provides a comprehensive treatment of this rapidly growing segment of the power industry. It provides the fundamentals of wind and solar power generation, energy conversion and storage, and the operational aspects of power electronics and the quality of power. It covers in detail the design, operation, and control methods applicable to stand-alone as well as grid-connected power systems and discusses the present status of and the on-going research in renewable power around the world.Wind and Solar Power Systems stands as the most modern, complete book available on renewable energy. Electrical, environmental and mechanical engineering professionals along with policy-makers evaluating the renewable energy potential of their regions will find in it the background and the details they need for decision making.


Synopsis:
Renewable Power Systems explains how wind and solar energy generate electrical power. The book covers the fundamentals of the wind and photovoltaic power generation – design, operation, and control methods applicable to the stand-alone as well as grid-connected power systems – steady state as well as dynamic performance and operation – methods for extracting the maximum power at a given site – past and present trends as well as anticipated growth – and energy maps of several countries, useful for assessing the annual energy potential of any site.



TABLE OF CONTENTS:

1. Introduction
1 (6)
1.1 Industry Overview
1 (2)
1.2 Incentives for Renewables
3 (1)
1.3 Utility Perspective
4 (2)
1.3.1 Modularity
4 (2)
1.3.2 Emission-Free
6 (1)
References
6 (1)
2. Wind Power
7 (10)
2.1 Wind in the World
7 (3)
2.2 The U.S.A.
10 (3)
2.3 Europe
13 (1)
2.4 India
14 (1)
2.5 Mexico
14 (1)
2.6 Ongoing Research and Development
15 (1)
References
15 (2)
3. Photovoltaic Power
17 (18)
3.1 Present Status
19 (5)
3.2 Building Integrated pv Systems
24 (2)
3.3 pv Cell Technologies
26 (4)
3.3.1 Single-Crystalline Silicon
26 (1)
3.3.2 Polycrystalline and Semicrystalline
26 (1)
3.3.3 Thin Films
27 (1)
3.3.4 Amorphous Silicon
27 (1)
3.3.5 Spheral
28 (1)
3.3.6 Concentrated Cells
29 (1)
3.4 pv Energy Maps
30 (3)
References
33 (2)
4. Wind Speed and Energy Distributions
35 (36)
4.1 Speed and Power Relations
35 (2)
4.2 Power Extracted from the Wind
37 (2)
4.3 Rotor Swept Area
39 (1)
4.4 Air Density
40 (1)
4.5 Global Wind Patterns
41 (2)
4.6 Wind Speed Distribution
43 (14)
4.6.1 Weibull Probability Distribution
44 (4)
4.6.2 Mode and Mean Speeds
48 (1)
4.6.3 Root Mean Cube Speed
49 (1)
4.6.4 Mode, Mean, and rmc Speeds Compared
50 (1)
4.6.5 Energy Distribution
51 (2)
4.6.6 Digital Data Loggers
53 (1)
4.6.7 Effect of Height
54 (1)
4.6.8 Importance of Reliable Data
55 (2)
4.7 Wind Speed Prediction
57 (1)
4.8 Wind Resource Maps
57 (12)
4.8.1 The U.S.A.
57 (2)
4.8.2 Minnesota
59 (1)
4.8.3 The United Kingdom
59 (1)
4.8.4 Europe
59 (1)
4.8.5 Mexico
59 (2)
4.8.6 India
61 (8)
References
69 (2)
5. Wind Power System
71 (22)
5.1 System Components
71 (7)
5.1.1 Tower
72 (1)
5.1.2 Turbine Blades
73 (3)
5.1.3 Yaw Control
76 (1)
5.1.4 Speed Control
76 (2)
5.2 Turbine Rating
78 (3)
5.3 Electrical Load Matching
81 (1)
5.4 Variable-Speed Operation
82 (1)
5.5 System Design Features
83 (3)
5.5.1 Number of Blades
83 (2)
5.5.2 Rotor Upwind or Downwind
85 (1)
5.5.3 Horizontal Axis Versus Vertical Axis
85 (1)
5.5.4 Spacing of the Towers
85 (1)
5.6 Maximum Power Operation
86 (3)
5.6.1 Constant Tip-Speed Ratio Scheme
87 (1)
5.6.2 Peak Power Tracking Scheme
88 (1)
5.7 System Control Requirements
89 (2)
5.7.1 Speed Control
89 (1)
5.7.2 Rate Control
90 (1)
5.8 Environmental Aspects
91 (1)
5.8.1 Audible Noise
91 (1)
5.8.2 Electromagnetic Interference (EMI)
92 (1)
References
92 (1)
6. Electrical Generator
93 (18)
6.1 Electromechanical Energy Conversion
93 (3)
6.1.1 DC Machine
95 (1)
6.1.2 Synchronous Machine
95 (1)
6.1.3 Induction Machine
96 (1)
6.2 Induction Generator
96 (13)
6.2.1 Construction
96 (1)
6.2.2 Working Principle
97 (2)
6.2.3 Rotor Speed and Slip
99 (2)
6.2.4 Equivalent Circuit for Performance Calculations
101 (2)
6.2.5 Efficiency and Cooling
103 (1)
6.2.6 Self-Excitation Capacitance
104 (2)
6.2.7 Torque-Speed Characteristic
106 (1)
6.2.8 Transients
107 (2)
References
109 (2)
7. Generator Drives
111 (14)
7.1 Speed Control Regions
112 (2)
7.2 Generator Drives
114 (8)
7.2.1 One Fixed-Speed Drive
116 (1)
7.2.2 Two Fixed-Speeds Drive
117 (2)
7.2.3 Variable-Speed Using Gear Drive
119 (1)
7.2.4 Variable-Speed Using Power Electronics
119 (1)
7.2.5 Scherbius Variable-Speed Drive
120 (1)
7.2.6 Variable-Speed Direct Drive
121 (1)
7.3 Drive Selection
122 (1)
7.4 Cut-Out Speed Selection
122 (2)
References
124 (1)
8. Solar Photovoltaic Power System
125 (22)
8.1 The pv Cell
125 (2)
8.2 Module and Array
127 (1)
8.3 Equivalent Electrical Circuit
127 (3)
8.4 Open Circuit Voltage and Short Circuit Current
130 (1)
8.5 i-v and p-v Curves
131 (1)
8.6 Array Design
132 (10)
8.6.1 Sun Intensity
132 (2)
8.6.2 Sun Angle
134 (1)
8.6.3 Shadow Effect
135 (2)
8.6.4 Temperature Effect
137 (1)
8.6.5 Effect of Climate
138 (1)
8.6.6 Electrical Load Matching
138 (1)
8.6.7 Sun Tracking
139 (3)
8.7 Peak Power Point Operation
142 (1)
8.8 pv System Components
143 (2)
References
145 (2)
9. Solar Thermal System
147 (14)
9.1 Energy Collection
148 (2)
9.1.1 Parabolic Trough
148 (1)
9.1.2 Central Receiver
149 (1)