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Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

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Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)
731.3 MB | 1:21:16 | Swedish with Eng.+Tur. s/t | XviD, 1130 Kb/s | 656x496

“God, why did you desert me?” With Winter Light, master craftsman Ingmar Bergman explores the search for redemption in a meaningless existence. In this stark depiction of spiritual crisis, small-town pastor Tomas Ericsson (Gunnar Björnstrand) performs his duties mechanically before a dwindling congregation. When he is asked to assist with a troubled parishioner’s (Max von Sydow) debilitating fear of nuclear annihilation, Tomas is terrified to find that he can provide nothing but his own uncertainty. Beautifully photographed by Sven Nykvist, Winter Light is an unsettling look at the human craving for personal validation in a world seemingly abandoned by God. Criterion

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

On a cold winter's Sunday, the pastor of a small rural church (Tomas Ericsson) performs service for a tiny congregation; though he is suffering from a cold and a severe crisis of faith. After the service, he attempts to console a fisherman (Jonas Persson) who is tormented by anxiety, but Tomas can only speak about his own troubled relationship with God. A school teacher (Maerta Lundberg) offers Tomas her love as consolation for his loss of faith. But Tomas resists her love as desperately as she offers it to him. This is the second in Bergman's trilogy of films dealing with man's relationship with God. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0057358/plotsummary)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Between 1961 and 1963, Ingmar Bergman released a remarkable trilogy of so-called chamber dramas, each one concerned with the futility of sustaining faith in God, family, love, or much else. The series proved transitional for the internationally renowned Swedish filmmaker, securing his crucial collaboration with cinematographer Sven Nykvist (with whom Bergman would go on to make his many masterpieces–including Persona and Cries and Whispers–of the '60s, '70s, and early '80s), and underscoring a new preference for intimate, relationship-driven stories, austere settings, and haunting tones of emotional isolation and despair. (–Tom Keogh - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Following Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light reunites Gunnar Björnstrand, this time playing a pastor suffering a crisis of faith while ministering to a shrinking congregation, and Max Von Sydow as a parishioner lost to acute anxiety over the possibility of a nuclear holocaust. Neither man can help or heal the other, or even inspire renewed confidence in practiced rituals and older, more certain views of the world. Set on a chilly, Sunday afternoon, Winter Light's heavy stillness, lack of music, preference for intense close-ups and distancing long shots, and barren setting all lead us inescapably into the core of a profound silence, an echo chamber in which love can't grow and religion rings hollow. The trilogy concludes with The Silence. (–Tom Keogh - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

At the beginning of the 1960s, renowned film director Ingmar Bergman began work on what were to become some of his most powerful and representative works—the Trilogy. Already a figure of tremendous international acclaim for such masterworks as The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and The Virgin Spring, Bergman turned his back on the abundant symbolism and exotic imagery of his ‘50s work to focus on a series of impacted, emotionally explosive chamber dramas examining faith and alienation in the modern age. Utilizing a new cameraman—the incomparable Sven Nykvist—Bergman unleashed Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, and The Silence in rapid succession, exposing moviegoers worldwide to a new level of intellectual and emotional intensity. Each film employs minimal dialogue, eerily isolated settings, and searing performances from such Bergman regulars as Max von Sydow, Harriet Andersson, Gunnar Bjornstrand, Ingrid Thulin and Gunnel Lindblom in their evocation of a desperate world confronted with God’s desertion. Drawing on Bergman’s own severely religious upbringing and ensuing spiritual crisis, the films in the Trilogy are deeply personal, challenging, and enriching works that exhibit the filmmaker’s peerless formal mastery and fierce intelligence. (-Product Description)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)

Ingmar Bergman-Nattvardsgästerna ('Winter Light') (1962)