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Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Posted By: FNB47
Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)
1462.5 MB | 1:46:32 | French with English s/t | XviD, 1660 Kb/s | 528x400

Widely regarded as one of the greatest films ever made, Jean Renoir’s masterpiece The Rules of the Game is a scathing critique of corrupt French society cloaked in a comedy of manners. At a weekend hunting party, amorous escapades abound among the aristocratic guests and are mirrored by the activities of the servants downstairs. The refusal of one of the guests to play by society’s rules sets off a chain of events that ends in tragedy. Poorly received upon its release in 1939, the film was severely re-edited, and the original negative was destroyed during World War II. Only in 1959 was the film fully reconstructed and embraced by audiences and critics who now see the film as a timeless representation of a vanishing way of life. criterion.com

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Aviator André Jurieux has just completed a record-setting flight, but when he is greeted by an admiring crowd, all he can say to them is how miserable he is that the woman he loves did not come to meet him. He is in love with Christine, the wife of aristocrat Robert de la Cheyniest. Robert himself is involved in an affair with Geneviève de Marras, but he is trying to break it off. Meanwhile, André seeks help from his old friend Octave, who gets André an invitation to the country home where Robert and Christine are hosting a large hunting party. As the guests arrive for the party, their cordial greetings hide their real feelings, along with their secrets - and even some of the servants are involved in tangled relationships. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0031885/plotsummary)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

When the film opened in 1939, initial reception of it was so bad that one viewer lit a newspaper and tried to burn the theater that it was playing in. There were even threats to other theaters. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0031885/trivia)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Despite now being considered one of the best films made by many historians, the picture almost became a lost art. Claiming that it was bad for the morale of the country (due to impending war), the French government banned the film about a month after its original release. When Germany took over France the following year, it was banned by the Nazi party as well, who also burnt many of the prints. Allied planes then accidentally destroyed the original negatives. It was thought to be a lost picture. In 1956, some followers of director Jean Renoir found enough pieces of the film scattered throughout France to reconstitute it with Renoir's help. Renoir claimed only one minor scene was missing from the original cut. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0031885/trivia)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Consistently cited by critics worldwide as one of the greatest films ever made, Jean Renoir's bittersweet drama of life, love, class, and the social code of manners and behavior ("the rules of the game") is a savage critique undertaken with sensitivity and compassion. Renoir's catch-phrase through the film, "Everyone has their reasons," develops a multilayered meaning by the conclusion. A young aviator (Roland Toutain) commits a serious social faux pas by alluding to an affair on national radio. To avert a scandal, the cultured Robert de la Chesnaye (Marcel Dalio), husband to the aviator's mistress, Christine (Nora Gregor), and a philanderer in his own right, invites all to a weekend hunting party in his country mansion. The complicated maze of marriages and mistresses (social register and servant class alike) is plotted like a bedroom farce, but the tone soon takes a darker cast. Renoir, who also takes the pivotal role as Andre's jovial pal and de la Chesnaye confidant Octave, deftly blends high comedy with cutting satire as he parallels the upstairs-downstairs affairs. The film builds to a comic pitch with the hilarious performance of Julien Carette as a rabbit poacher turned groundskeeper, but soon turns tragic in a devastating conclusion. The film was roundly condemned and banned in France upon its 1939 release, but years later (out of the shadow of WWII) the film was rediscovered for the masterpiece that it is. (–Sean Axmaker - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)

Jean Renoir-La Règle du jeu (1939)