Eric Rohmer-Die Marquise von O... (1976)

Posted By: FNB47
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Eric Rohmer-Die Marquise von O… (1976)
1463.4 MB | 1:38:25 | German with English s/t | XviD, 1810 Kb/s | 720x544

After Eric Rohmer completed his "Six Moral Tales," and before launching into the "Comedies and Proverbs," he tackled two projects very different from anything else in his career. In the first of these, The Marquise of O, based on the novel by Heinrich von Kleist, Rohmer leaves the young intellectuals of Paris for Italy during the Napoleonic wars. During the Russian invasion, the beautiful young marquise (Edith Clever) is saved from certain assault by a handsome and dashing count (Bruno Ganz)…

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She spends the night guarded by her chivalrous savior, who returns months later to rather insistently court her. Only when he leaves does she discover that she is, unaccountably, pregnant. Rohmer's style is both more lush (shot in rich colors by Néstor Almendros) and less intimate than his previous romantic comedies, directed in painterly compositions at a removed distance…

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Eric Rohmer on the left…

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Unlike the self-obsessed young adults of his modern films, the count and the marquise act out of moral duty and social responsibility, and their actions reverberate through family and community. Yet this is still a Rohmer film, filled with carefully tooled dialogue (spoken in German) and informed by irony. The story of innocence and corruption, and the shades that lie within even the best of men, ends on a note of delicate forgiveness and understanding. Rohmer followed this with an even more unexpected stylistic experiment, the beautiful and beguiling Perceval. (–Sean Axmaker - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

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Otto Sander

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If the romantic poet and playwright Heinrich von Kleist (who wrote almost at the same time as Goethe) could have imagined the cinema, he would have approved of Rohmer's filming of his novella. What we see here are not 20th century characters in costume, but early 19th century Romantic sensibilities reacting according to their way of looking at the world. It is as strange as time travel, and utterly charming. Rohmer frames them in sets like Caspar Friedrich or Fuseli paintings. This movie is a marvel. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0074870/usercomments)

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"The Marquise of O" is one of Eric Rohmer's historical films. This story takes place during the Franco-Prussian War. One night as the Russians attack, the Marquise, a young widow with two children, is assaulted by a band of Russian soldiers. Fortunately, she is rescued by a young Russian Count. Several months later, it becomes apparent that the Marquise is pregnant, and no one believes her protests that she hasn't touched a man since her husband died. (amazon.com)

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The very best things about this film are the philosophical questions raised by the dilemma of the pregnant Marquise and her pesky, persistent suitor–the Count. How does one accept a knight in shining armour who has fallen from his pedestal? Are the actions of the Count motivated by guilt? How does one align the fate of the Marquise's would-be-attackers with the behaviour of the Count? Is forgiveness possible? (amazon.com)

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Also, the class attitudes were quite fascinating. When the Marquise discovers and accepts her pregnancy, the lower classes exhibit a sort of sly, knowing joy in her dilemma. Both the Dr and the midwife have seem these sorts of situations many times before, and they are all too familiar with the denials the frantic Marquise makes to her unbelieving family. The sudden, unwelcome familiarity–of both the Dr and the midwife–evident in their tone shifts when speaking to the Marquise–indicates that she is about to experience a decline in society. (amazon.com)

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If the romantic poet and playwright Heinrich von Kleist (who wrote almost at the same time as Goethe) could have imagined the cinema, he would have approved of Rohmer's filming of his novella. What we see here are not 20th century characters in costume, but early 19th century Romantic sensibilities reacting according to their way of looking at the world. It is as strange as time travel, and utterly charming. Rohmer frames them in sets like Caspar Friedrich or Fuseli paintings. This movie is a marvel. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0074870/usercomments)

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