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François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

Posted By: FNB47
François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)
730.5 MB | 1:24:42 | French with Eng.+Tur. s/t | XviD, 1040 Kb/s | 608x368

Based on a real-life case study, recorded in Jean-Marc Gaspard Itard's 1806 volume Memoire et Rapport sur Victor de L'Aveyron, The Wild Child is spiritually in line with François Truffaut's other films about the pains of adolescence. Truffaut himself plays Dr. Jean Itard, a doctor working at Paris' Institute for the Deaf and Dumb. Itard takes on the challenge of Victor (Jean-Pierre Cargol), a nonverbal "wild boy" found abandoned in the woods. Realizing that the Institute's rather cruel methods may drive Victor further into himself, Dr. Itard brings the boy to his own home, hoping to establish a communication base with kindness and compassion. Once he has taught Victor how to listen and respond, Itard takes it upon himself to imbue the boy with a sense of morality. Adopting an austere cinematic technique (at times reminiscent of silent films), Truffaut unfolds his story with directness and simplicity. AMG

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut

1798. In a forrest, some countrymen catch a wild child who can not walk, speak, read neither write. The Doctor Itard is interested by the child, and starts to educate him. Everybody thinks he will fail, but with a lot of love and patience, he manages to obtain results… This is a true story. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0064285/plotsummary)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut's fascinating 1969 film, based on a real-life, 18th-century behavioral scientist's efforts to turn a feral boy into a civilized specimen, is an ingenious and poignant experience. In a piece of resonant casting that immediately turns this story into an echo of the creative process, Truffaut himself plays Dr. Itard, a specialist in the teaching of the deaf. (–Tom Keogh - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

Itard takes in a young lad (Jean-Pierre Cargol) found to have been living like an animal in the woods all his life. In the spirit of social experiment, Itard uses rewards and punishments to retool the boy's very existence into something that will impress the world. Beautifully photographed in black and white and making evocative use of such charmingly antiquated filmmaking methods as the iris shot, The Wild Child has a semidocumentary form that barely veils Truffaut's confessional slant. (–Tom Keogh - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

What does it mean to turn the raw material of life into a monument to one's own experience and bias? The question has all sorts of intriguing reverberations when one considers that Truffaut's own wild childhood was rescued by love of the cinema and that a degree of verisimilitude factors into his films starring Jean-Pierre Leaud–the troubled lad who grew up in Truffaut's work from The 400 Blows onward. (The Wild Child is dedicated to Leaud.) (–Tom Keogh - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)

François Truffaut-L'Enfant sauvage (1969)